“Monopathy, or over-specialisation, eventually retreats into defending what one has learnt rather than making new connections. The initial spurt of learning gives out, and the expert is left, like an animal, merely defending his territory. One sees this in the academic arena, where ancient professors vie with each other to expel intruders from their hard-won patches. Just look at the bitter arguments over how far the sciences should be allowed to encroach on the humanities. But the polymath, whatever his or her ‘level’ or societal status, is not constrained to defend their own turf. The polymath’s identity and value comes from multiple mastery.”
Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.
I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.
It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal. Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.
I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.
It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal. Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.
I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.
It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal. Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.
I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.
It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal. Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.
I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.
It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal. Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.
I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.
It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal.

Gorgeous portraits by Richard Davies.

I think Skyler needs to be rendered in the same style.

It’s gonna be sad when Breaking Bad reaches the end, but I know it’ll be phenomenal.

fer1972:

The Incredible Miniature Libraries of  Marc Giai-Miniet
fer1972:

The Incredible Miniature Libraries of  Marc Giai-Miniet
fer1972:

The Incredible Miniature Libraries of  Marc Giai-Miniet
fer1972:

The Incredible Miniature Libraries of  Marc Giai-Miniet

fer1972:

The Incredible Miniature Libraries of  

(via iainbroome)

I just discovered Santtu Mustonen’s work and it’s awesome. The way he brings traditional technique into 3D is really striking. 
(via butdoesitfloat) I just discovered Santtu Mustonen’s work and it’s awesome. The way he brings traditional technique into 3D is really striking. 
(via butdoesitfloat) I just discovered Santtu Mustonen’s work and it’s awesome. The way he brings traditional technique into 3D is really striking. 
(via butdoesitfloat)

I just discovered Santtu Mustonen’s work and it’s awesome. The way he brings traditional technique into 3D is really striking.

(via butdoesitfloat)

After the Rain III by Thierry Feuz.

His website has generously hi-res versions of his paintings, I recommend having a look.

(via butdoesitfloat)

Cotton “paintings” by Jayson Musson from his show Halcyon Days.
Excerpt from his description over at Salon 94:

The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity. Even the old Coogi slogan “Wearable Art” seemed to confirm the desire for each sweater to be considered an objet unique, a specialized commodity.
Cotton “paintings” by Jayson Musson from his show Halcyon Days.
Excerpt from his description over at Salon 94:

The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity. Even the old Coogi slogan “Wearable Art” seemed to confirm the desire for each sweater to be considered an objet unique, a specialized commodity.
Cotton “paintings” by Jayson Musson from his show Halcyon Days.
Excerpt from his description over at Salon 94:

The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity. Even the old Coogi slogan “Wearable Art” seemed to confirm the desire for each sweater to be considered an objet unique, a specialized commodity.

Cotton “paintings” by Jayson Musson from his show Halcyon Days.

Excerpt from his description over at Salon 94:

The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity. Even the old Coogi slogan “Wearable Art” seemed to confirm the desire for each sweater to be considered an objet unique, a specialized commodity.

Since these mysteries are beyond us, let us pretend to have devised them Since these mysteries are beyond us, let us pretend to have devised them Since these mysteries are beyond us, let us pretend to have devised them
lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect. lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect. lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect. lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect. lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect. lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect. lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana PesutSee More here.On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect.

lifeisnotarehearsal:

andrewneilblog:

‘Switcheroo’ - A project by Hana Pesut
See More here.
On Tumblr.

loving it!

This is perfect.

check-it:

Using a slitscan process Jay Mark Johnson explores spacetime by replacing one dimension (X axis) with another (time). As time becomes the constant rather than the variable, only motion is visible as our world moves through this sliver of our 4th dimension.

By Jay Mark Johnson

(via PRISCILLA HAMBURG SERIES 2007 — Jay Mark Johnson)